Everything about The Wilhelm Times

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Letzte Woche hatte ich über die Klon-Zeitungen in TV-Serien gebloggt, die in ziemlich vielen Folgen genau gleich aussehen, jetzt hat Slate die Story dazu und ich hatte Recht: Es handelt sich tatsächlich um die gleichen Druckvorlagen, die bereits seit den 60s verwendet werden. Die Dinger kommen aus einem Laden namens Earl Hays Press und die haben noch Comics, Magazine, Zeitungen und noch viel mehr.

Brow Beat has learned that the prop comes from a small newspaper prop company called the Earl Hays Press in Sun Valley, Calif. Started in 1915, Earl Hays is one of the oldest newspaper prop companies, and the paper in question was first printed in the 1960s (note the top-hat ad on the lower left), then offered as a “period paper,” better suited for Mad Men (where it has not appeared) than Scrubs (where it has). The screenshots don’t actually reveal the same prop—just various printings of the same file. The front is blank and can be customized, but the inside and back page are always identical. In fact, in No Country for Old Men, when Tommy Lee Jones is reading a paper at a diner, the section in his hands is the same as the one sitting on the table, suggesting that the prop master bought two copies to make the paper look fuller, but made the mistake of leaving the stock spread facing up.

Production companies use prop newspapers instead of real ones because getting clearance from an actual publication is usually more work than it’s worth in potential fees and bureaucracy. (There are exceptions. When Tony Soprano picked up his paper each morning, it was always the Newark Star Ledger.) Rather than battle the legal department at the New York Times for that perfunctory breakfast shot, prop masters buy a stack of Earl Hays fake papers, which cost just $15 each. Sometimes if they have some left over they’ll recycle them for another job.

The Story Behind the Recycled Newspaper Prop (Danke Sebastian!)

In : Filmfun

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  1. Sebastian

    Och bitte :-)

    Ich hab’s auch nur bei Pop Candy gelesen und musste an Euch denken, weil ihr bei iX verlinkt wart. Alles vernetzt ;-)

  2. GunGrave

    … aha – das ist ja auch mal interessant.

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