Lawrence Lessig reviewt The Social Network

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Larry Lessig ist vielleicht nicht allen F5-Lesern ein Begriff: Der Mann hat Creative Commons erfunden, ein alternatives Modell zum bisherigen Lizensierungsverfahren im amerikanischen Copyright, dass den Kreativen (viel) größere Freiheiten dabei einräumt und der Mann reist um die Welt und hält Vorträge über Netzneutralität, Urheberrecht und korrupte Regierungen und was das alles mit dem Internet zu tun hat. Kurz gesagt: Der Mann ist wichtig und man sollte sich mal 20 Minuten Zeit nehmen und sich diesen brillanten Vortrag über Copyright bei der TED-Konferenz anschauen.

Nun ist der Mann kein Filmkritiker, aber dennoch ist ein Review von Finchers „The Social Network“ von ihm ziemlich interessant und er räumt mit ein paar Dingen auf, die im Film faktisch falsch dargestellt werden. (via /.)

the most frustrating bit of The Social Network is not its obliviousness to the silliness of modern American law. It is its failure to even mention the real magic behind the Facebook story. In interviews given after making the film, Sorkin boasts about his ignorance of the Internet. That ignorance shows. This is like a film about the atomic bomb which never even introduces the idea that an explosion produced through atomic fission is importantly different from an explosion produced by dynamite. Instead, we’re just shown a big explosion ($25 billion in market capitalization—that’s a lot of dynamite!) and expected to grok (the word us geek-wannabes use to show you we know of what we speak) the world of difference this innovation in bombs entails.

What is important in Zuckerberg’s story is not that he’s a boy genius. He plainly is, but many are. It’s not that he’s a socially clumsy (relative to the Harvard elite) boy genius. Every one of them is. And it’s not that he invented an amazing product through hard work and insight that millions love. The history of American entrepreneurism is just that history, told with different technologies at different times and places.

Instead, what’s important here is that Zuckerberg’s genius could be embraced by half-a-billion people within six years of its first being launched, without (and here is the critical bit) asking permission of anyone. The real story is not the invention. It is the platform that makes the invention sing. Zuckerberg didn’t invent that platform. He was a hacker (a term of praise) who built for it. And as much as Zuckerberg deserves endless respect from every decent soul for his success, the real hero in this story doesn’t even get a credit.

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    officialgaygeeks:

    That lightsaber sound lol


    Get the My Neighbor Groot shirt http://buff.ly/1EFUcA2 http://ift.tt/1BEBgm8

    11/16/14

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    pennyfornasa:

    Putting The Cost Of The ESA’s Rosetta Mission In Perspective

    "So what do we get for our €1.4bn? Rosetta is both an astounding feat of engineering (catapulting a tonne of spacecraft across millions of kilometres of space and ending up in orbit around a comet just 4 km across) and an extraordinary opportunity for science (allowing us to examine the surface of a lump of rock and ice which dates from when the Solar System formed).

    Like a lot of blue-skies science, it’s very hard to put a value on the mission. First, there are the immediate spin-offs like engineering know-how; then, the knowledge accrued, which could inform our understanding of our cosmic origins, amongst other things; and finally, the inspirational value of this audacious feat in which we can all share, including the next generation of scientists.

    Whilst those things are hard to price precisely, in common with other blue-skies scientific projects, Rosetta is cheap. At €1.4bn, developing, building, launching and learning from the mission will cost about the same as 4.2 Airbus A380s—pretty impressive when you consider that it’s an entirely bespoke robotic spacecraft, not a production airliner. On a more everyday scale, it’s cost European citizens somewhere around twenty Euro cents per person per year since the project began in 1996.

    Rosetta has already sent us some stunning images of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko and today’s landing will, with any luck, provide us with our first close-up glimpse of the chaotic surface of this dirty snowball. If you’re a sci-fi fan, then, you might consider the mission to have been worth its price tag just for the pictures. The total cost for the Rosetta mission is about €3.50 per person in Europe; based on the average cinema ticket price in the UK (€8.50), it has cost less than half of what it will cost for you to go to see Interstellar.”

    Via Scienceogram: http://scienceogram.org/blog/2014/11/rosetta-comet-esa-lander-cost/

    Find Out How Budget Cuts Canceled NASA’s Own Comet Landing Mission: http://www.penny4nasa.org/2014/11/11/how-budget-cuts-canceled-nasa-own-rosetta-comet-landing-mission/

    11/15/14

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    meatbicyclevevo:

    i never wanted this to end

    10/20/14

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    iambluedog:

    Life is too short to be holding on to old grudges

    10/20/14

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    10/09/14